If you have attended a theory training workshop, you know that the first thing we do is have everyone take the shapes personality test. For those of you who haven’t attended a workshop yet, here are the simple steps for taking this test:

  1. Draw a square, triangle, circle, and squiggle on a piece of paper.
  2. Number them from 1 to 4 with one being the most representative of who you are and four being the least representative of who you are. Don’t worry at this stage if it feels like guess work. It partially is. Just look at the shapes and consider what they might represent and then number them accordingly.
  3. Once you have them numbered read the following brief descriptions:
    1. The square:  As the name suggests  squares like to have everything “squared up”.  Squares value organization, study, and education. Squares feel comfortable when they fully understand and agree with information that is taught. Squares typically have a higher level of focus and interest in the completion of a process than they do in the forming of relationships.
    2. The triangle: Again as the name implies, triangles are interested in getting to the point. They are driven, motivated, and hard working. Triangles are interested in helping other people get to the point as well. Triangles care about end results. They will take people with them as long as things are getting done. Triangles want measurable results.
    3. The circle: Circles care about completeness. They are interested in relationships far more than completion of projects. To them “completeness” is defined by the harmony of the group. They consider everyone’s opinion equally valuable. Circles feel most confident when decisions are made by group consensus. Circles are primarily motivated by a desire to help others to feel included and valuable.
    4. The squiggle: Squiggles are creative, free thinkers. The squiggle finds value in thinking up fresh, new ideas. Squiggles enjoy interaction with people and place a high value on fun and unique. Squiggles love to be the center of attention, not so much because of an inflated ego, as because they take great joy in making other people happy. Squiggles love to “think outside the box.” For them inventiveness is more important that completion of a project.
  4. Now that you’ve read the descriptions, how well did you do on numbering your shapes? Make adjustments as needed.

Consider how squares might relate to  other squares and the other three personalities:

  1. Which personality would the square gravitate toward?
  2. Which personality would the square have the most trouble getting along with? why?
  3. What personality would the squares most respect?
  4. What problems might the squares have in working on a team?

Consider how triangles might relate to other triangles and the other three personalities:

  1. Which personality would the triangle gravitate toward?
  2. Which personality would the triangle have the most trouble getting along with? why?
  3. What personality would the triangle most respect?
  4. What problems might the triangle have in working on a team?

Consider how circles might relate to other circles and the other three personalities:

  1. Which personality would the circle gravitate toward?
  2. Which personality would the circle have the most trouble getting along with? Why?
  3. Which personality would the circle most respect?
  4. What problems might the circle have in working on a team?

Consider how squiggles might relate to other squiggles and the other three personalities:

  1. Which personality would the squiggles gravitate toward?
  2. Which personality would the squiggles have the most trouble getting along with? Why?
  3. Which personality would the squiggles most respect?
  4. What problems might the squiggles have in working on a team?

What does understanding personality differences have to do with MAST? Please share your thoughts on this in the comment section.

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